Brut bottle hurricane

Following on from the successful use of a heavy bottle bottom for a copper foil sun-catcher, I wanted to try it again with a nice looking one on a Brut bottle. This one had a rope effect edge, and dotted circular textures on the punt, so I cut it about 8-10mm above the top of the punt. This left the rest of the bottle to use, and the bottle end will be used in another post in the near future.

floorboard hurricane

The long curving corked top neck looked good to form a chimney of sorts, so I decided to make a hurricane base for the bottle as cut. I cut a square base out of a floorboard remnant, and routed a circle into it for the bottle to sit in. I then made a deeper groove at the back, and drilled through into the groves section to create a concealed breather hole to allow air flow the chimney effect to feed the candle. The base was then sanded smooth for ease of handling, and a coat of light oak dye added for final effect.

Once dry, all that remained was to test the drawing effect of the base with a tea-light, which worked well. The top of the bottle got very hot even with a tea-light, but the glass is very thick, and a long burn showed it to be ok. Another ‘upcycled’ project completed with hardly any cost at all other than time and a tealight.

 

 

Sanctuary lamp

Following on from some of the wooden base hurricane style projects, I’ve had in mind for a while the notion of making a pair of sanctuary style candle lamps, based loosely on the coloured cylinder sanctuary lamps you can often see in churches. A candle burning in a coloured cylinder has always seemed quite appealing in look, and an open topped cylinder should present no real complication in maintaining airflow to keep the flame burning well. First stop is to make the glass cylinders from coloured wine bottles.

cylinderI had four olive coloured wine bottles available, and had two pairs in terms of both colour tint and shape, which should allow for simple making of two matching coloured cylinders. Ten months into the hobby, I’m now pretty confident in cutting wine bottles and finishing the bottle edges to a good, clean standard , so two closely matching cylinders didn’t prove difficult.  Next stage is to make a base or holder for the cylinders.

I’ve corbelnever been a skilled woodworker, but a few projects into using the Dremel circle cutter attachment, I’m beginning to find my own best method to get a neat routed circle into timber, so wood is starting to look more and more a complimentary material for cut bottle projects. I’m even beginning to start to think about taking a local wood-turning course in the future, which could be complimentary to bottle cutting. A wooden base for the cylinder was the choice, though I’m not up to creating anything structured, so i looked around and found a number of pairs of corbels for sale on Ebay, as I thought a corbel could be promising as the wall mount. A pair with a flat top of around 95mm square were found and ordered, and that was near ideal size for the approximate 72mm diameter wine bottle cylinders.

corbel routingNext step was to router the circle into the flat top, after gauging the outer radius of the glass cylinder at around 37mm. Some comfort room for glass expansion and wood movement is required. I wanted the end finish to be as neat as possible and, as it was going to be cutting into the end grain, I was concerned about splintering and general untidiness. I set the first sweep round at 1.5mm, and only a third of the max revs of the Dremel. This gave a very neat circle, which was pleasing, and I tested the cylinder fit, which was ideal. I cleaned out the groove and continued the same gradual process having increased the depth of cut by another 1.5mm or so, and repeated this process four times to get a good depth of around 6mm minimum. This should give enough support to avoid any accidental falling of the cylinder from the mount. The groove was very neat, as can been seen in the photo, and a light sanding was performed to soften the edge down a little.

sanctuary lampLast job was to mount a candle, light it and add the cylinder into the groove, and test how the candles burns. Despite no chimney effect from a bottom air feed, the open top should be ample to allow the flame to be fed enough oxygen to thrive. So far, so good.

A second corbel was routed in the same way, with identical results. I think I’ll add an English Oak dye finish to the corbels, though I’ve no particular plan of where they will will end up. Quite a pleasing attempt, as I didn’t expect it to go quite as well as it did. Certainly the neatest bit of wood routing I’ve managed so far.

 

Table centrepiece

Following on from my earlier wooden bases post, I was very pleased to get a request from a friend for a white coloured base with a tall clear bottle. I had a long think about what to make, and how, as it was a different style to the ones I had been making with stained wooden bases for beer and whiskey cut-down bottles. A full size wine bottle would give the greatest height, though I wondered how good a clear bottle would look as a candle centrepiece, with no colour to the glass. A week or two later, I was then given a perfect bottle for the job, which was clear and tall bodied, but with a very pale tint to the glass. This just gave it a slightly different look, especially as it was being sunk into a white painted base.  I cut the bottom from the bottle as low as possible, taking great care to get it right first score, and edge it very neatly. The end result was ideal for the job.

routered floorboardFor the base, I again used one of the remnants of floorboard from the shed, keeping things ‘reused and recycled’, and measured the diameter of the bottle base at around 75mm to the middle of the glass. fortunately, this wine bottle was pretty round, which they are not always. I set up the circle cutter attachment on the Dremel rotary tool, and found the centre point of the board. Two rotations were done, with a slight adjustment to give a circle of 5-6mm to keep a snug grip on the bottle (approximately 4mm) without being too tight when painted.Dremel circle cutter A quick test fitting showed this to be fine, and the overall depth of around 5mm seems fine to keep the bottle stable.

Once the circle was right, the next job was to create a channel that vents underneath the glass edge for air to draw into the bottle chamber when the candle is burning inside. Ideally, you don’t want this to be too noticeable, but it has to be large enough to draw through sufficient air to allow the flame to thrive, and not self-extinguish. I marked the centre of the back edge to a point about 20mm inside the circle. Switching the Dremel tool to the router edge guide attachment,  I routed a 8mm channel to a depth a further 3mm below the circle channel where the bottle edge sits. testing drawThere’s no science to this bit, so I tested the candle inside the bottle to make sure it drew enough air to burn nicely.

Now all the routing was done, I could cut down the end square from the plank remnant, leaving a uniform 20mm on both sides for symmetry, and begun sanding down the base surfaces and adding a slight radius to the square edges to avoid splinters. To minimise the roughness inside the groves, I found it best to fold over the edge of some sandpaper several times to form a solid block which could be moved around inside the circle to smooth it down a bit. As you are always crossing the grain on a few parts, it was difficult to not have the odd bit of roughness in the grove, but it was sanded as best could be, and the bottle hides this well anyway.

White baseOnce complete, this only left the final coating to get the white look desired. I asked a decorator friend about lime or whitewash products, which are available to buy, but he also suggested watering down a white emulsion. I had some in the shed, and did a test coat on the other end of the remnant at about 60:40 water to paint mix. It worked well, leaving some grain visible, and dried quickly, so I just bashed on and gave it two coats all over, giving the end grains and grooves plenty of mixture to soak in fully. The end result was pleasing, with a slightly washed out feel, and helps to show the pale blue tint off quite nicely. Next job is to successfully ship it off to Norway in one piece, where hopefully it will be useful as a centrepiece for a dining table.

Wooden bases part 1

Having got to grips with chopping the bottoms off bottles cleanly, and getting a very satisfactory final finish, it was time to explore a few options for a bottomless bottle, other than the hanging lights that I’ve done a few of already. Looking around for a few ideas, the combination of coloured glass bottles and wood looks good together, and there’s some good looking designs with hurricane style candle lamps using flat bases. Probably the finest ones I’ve seen have been bases on old barrel sections, but there’s also a number of tea-light holders based on driftwood and logs sections.

Floorboard section

I placed the prepared bottle centrally on the floorboard, and drew round it’s outer circumference for the outline. The inside outline can be gauged by the bottle thickness, which in this case averaged 4-5mm. At this stage, if you place your bottle over a lit candle to gauge how it will look, you will notice that the flame will soon start to struggle and dies.Routered baseYou soon work out that a channel or some other method for drawing air into the bottle is required, creating a chimney ‘drawing’ effect. You could drill a hole in the glass as low as possible, but it’s best not to weaken it too much as it’s likely to be handled a quite a lot.  You could have the base on some feet, and let it draw through some holes in the base if you prefer a less visible solution. In this case, I thought I’d start with a thin channel of about 2-3mm, and deepen it if required to allow more air to drag through. If a tea-light is the intended use, you could also add a central circle outline of around 37-38mm, which would help stop it moving off centre.
 

Floorboard light

I routed the outlines out using a Dremel rotary tool, testing the depth and width of the circles with the bottle till it was a good enough fit. Then I adjusted the router height, and increased the cut depth of the two airflow channels. Once happy enough with the overall bottle fit and airflow performance, the top and all edges were sanded and rounded down, and the wood was given a couple of coats of oak wood dye. I avoided the notion of any varnish or was, as its final use might well be in a warm fireplace, or it may be affected by the heat under the bottle itself, which does get surprisingly warm even with a tea-light. Overall, the finished look is not too bad for a ‘rough and ready’ same day experiment. I retained the tongue and groove parts of the floorboard, just to show its re-used nature. A very cheap and straightforward little experiment using leftover bits and bobs, with only a tea-light as a new expense.

 [skip to wooden bases part 2 here]