Bottle end suncatcher

Following on from the first attempt at combining bottle cutting with copper-foil glass making,bottle bottom I’d earlier prepared a few more bottle ends, using the same technique of UV bonding a cut and finished beer bottle end onto a circular piece of 3mm clear glass. The 3mm clear was then quite straightforward to copper-foil, and would sit flat to aid soldering when combined with the other glass which is mostly 3mm also.

I had two brown beer bottles, and some green ones, but the brown ones are the better looking of the two colours, as the green ones have an off-centre circle imprint on them, which doesn’t look so great. The brown tones would dictate the overall look. After a long time deliberating what to do, I finally took an idea from two of my favourite design styles I’ve seen while browsing the net. I like abstract flowers and trees that are a pure circle on a stalk, but by far my favourite stained glass designs are the Prairie style stained glass designs of the architect Frank Lloyd Wright. prarie hangerThe amber tones and wheat grain heads are glorious. Thought I’d read that these geometric designs are best suited to lead rather than copper foil, I thought a simple one wouldn’t be too difficult to do. I had a perfect piece of speckled amber glass to form the wheat grains, and cutting them neatly wasn’t difficult with the use of a small cutting square. The look was quite pleasing, so I opted for clear 3mm glass above and below the amber chevrons, to emphasise them, and not to be overwhelmingly coloured, and I think this decision turned out really well. I’m very pleased. Though the cutting on the edges of the circles could be a little bit closer, as they always run off when going to a point, but I’m pleased with the circles and the chevrons in particular. It’s given me more chance to practise my soldering technique, which does have a lot of room for improvement still. It’s also another hanger loop made from copper wire, which given how bad my first attempt was in  the evening class, I’m pleased with the progress there too on what is a fiddle of a process where you need four pair of hands. A copper patina was added to the final solder when complete, which was ideal for the prairie influenced style and colours. Overall, It took about 3.5 hours in total to do.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *